Fox Photo 1929

Guaranteed for life. December 1929. A history (Read here) of Fox Photo. Carl Newton began what by 1920 was the largest mail order photofinishing business in the world after purchasing the company from Arthur C. Fox of San Antonio, Texas. Found in a thrift shop in Springdale, Arkansas.

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Phillips 66

Reminds me of long-gone days as a child where I would pump gas, check oil and clean windshields at my old man’s gas station. Found in a thrift market in Springdale, Arkansas.

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Stand By Your Man…

He certainly looks like a feller you wouldn’t wanna cross. This is an 8×10….yes, an 8×10. How could I not pick this up? The only thing that could make this “treasure-of-a-find” any better would be a gold foiled Olan Mills stamp on it. But, I guess we can’t have everything. Found and quickly purchased in a thrift store in Eureka Springs, Arkansas.

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Holding Regiment

Confederate Cemetery Aug 55. Almost positive this was taken in Fayetteville, Arkansas. No other information provided. Found in a thrift market in Springdale, Arkansas.

In the Battle of Prairie Grove in Northwest Arkansas, there were over 2,500 casualties between Union and Confederate troops.

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American Wapiti or Elk

Currently getting a frame for this old postcard. The scan doesn’t do it justice. A beautiful work of art. No idea of the date but has to be pretty old. I Googled the street and just a remote side road comes up. The funny thing, there is no stamp or postmark. So, it was never sent?

1100-American Wapiti or Elk (Cow Elk). A product of NOBLE, inc. A Rembrant Post Card.

Friday
Dear Anita
Well here I am again. At the present time we are headed for a place about 20 miles from Philmont. Where we will spend the night. This morning we went through some of the clift (dwellings) around Mesa Verde. Love (Joy or Jay)

Anita Sullivan
200 Brunswick
Ponca City
Oklahoma

It Never Rains In…Tustin, California?

The image is not skewed in any way. A poorly manufactured print, this happened on occasion in those days. I’m guessing with a certain degree of confidence this is 1930s. Here is the real mystery – What the words actually say on the back of the photograph. The second-to-last letter is defiantly an “o” but was this a grammar error on part of the author? The closest city, area or what-not found was Tustin, California. A real Scooby Doo mystery. Jeenkies! Found in a thrift shop in Eureka Springs, Arkansas.

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Houston, we have lift off!

The words “AF Museum” are found on the back of this old photograph. Air Force would be the only explanation that comes to mind. Would like to say this is a 1950s image but it can’t be verified. Found in a thrift store in Rogers, Arkansas.

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Winter Wonderland

It won’t be long until Old Jack Frost makes an appearance. I’m hoping for a hard Winter here in Northwest Arkansas. The frilled edges and attire of the boy leads one to believe this was taken in the 1940s or early 1950s. But since there isn’t anything on the back of the photograph, it is only a guess. The object to the left looks like a very large flagpole? This group of photos are from up north somewhere. It never grows tiring looking at the houses from that era. Just beautiful. We need more steps and service porches today. Found in a thrift market in Lincoln, Arkansas.

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Wonder Cave

The plate on the vintage Pontiac says ’48. So, it would be a very good guess this was taken in 1948. The vehicle, by all accounts, is a 1941 Pontiac Torpedo and the bumper implores you to “See Beautiful Wonder Cave” in Monteagle, Tennessee. The Indiana plates are 864 369. Here is a very throughout web page describing the county history and cave. No other information on the photograph itself. Found in a thrift shop in Northwest, Arkansas.

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